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Showing posts from 2013

Big God, Little God

We believe in a big God. An infinite, all-powerful, all-present God who created the universe with a Word. He stands outside creation and his glory and power far surpass anything within that creation.

We believe in a personal God. A God who resides here among us, is intimately involved in the daily happenings of our life, and watches over those who trust in his care.

We can blow our mind trying to wrap it around both concepts at once. Our understanding of God only takes us so far and our limits in understanding mean we must, for the moment, be content to walk by faith and not by sight. And theological jargon -- words like omniscient, omnipresent, or omnipotent -- do not really add anything to our understanding of a personal God who dwells among us. On the other hand, singing "We have a friend in Jesus" only detracts from the incomprehensible infinity that characterizes the almighty God.

Thankfully, we find in scripture that both concepts -- God as transcendent and God as imm…

Faith versus Faith

Everyone believes in something and all understanding is based on faith.

Those are precisely the reasons I believe the current faith-versus-reason debate misses the mark entirely. When people start talking about faith and reason, the common view accepts the notion the two are opposite approaches to understanding. Religion, the story goes, and personal beliefs are a matter of faith, including belief in God or a supernatural, spiritual dimension to life. Reason, on the other hand, is  viewed as an objective approach to true, factual-based knowledge. Reason stands alone as the basis of science, facts, and truth. Faith is merely something we cling to for personal reasons.

The problem with this distinction is that it is all stuff-and-nonsense. Poppycock, I say.

Well, I must admit I've never actually said the word "poppycock," at least not in a non-ironic way. But the word seems to fit nicely here. The distinction between these two apparent contrasting approaches to understandi…